How To Inspect A Property Before Sale

Open inspections are a great opportunity for homebuyers to check the condition of the property they are targeting to buy. Buyers and investors should find time to personally visit the property to be able to make a guided buying decision. In fact, it would be a good idea to take down notes to keep track of the features that impress and don’t impress you.

A personal inspection of the home you are planning to buy can be done not only once. You can make several visits and while there, take the opportunity to snap photos of the different parts of the house. Just make sure to ask permission from the real estate agent before doing so. Further visits should be able to give you a real picture of the property’s condition and know its major and minor problems.

So what you should you look out for? Here are things that you need to be aware of.

Check for any obvious cracks in walls. Cracked walls can signal certain issues such as the house is sinking or needs the replacement of stumps. If large cracks are present, it would be best to get advice from a structural engineer.

Look for signs of leaking in gutters and eaves. Leaking gutters including roof that sag and broken roof tiles need repairs or replacement hence, it would be wise to ask about it from your real estate agent.

Also, look for obvious signs of recent patch ups or fixes that may be masking other issues. For example, peeling paint is a sign of moisture in the area while bubbles on paint can mean the presence of termites.

Find out if the floors are even or under foot. Floors that are sloping or bouncy could indicate the need to replace stumps.

Check if the bathroom or laundry has a smell of mould. Walls that have moulds signal excessive moisture in the area.

You may also ask the real estate agent or the seller for a due diligence checklist. They should be able to provide this checklist to prospective buyers at open for inspections.

Keep in mind that a home inspection is very important as it can tell you the defects of the property that could affect its value and the cost it would entail to repair them. This should not be taken for granted if you are buying a house to avoid a costly mistake.

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